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Coronavirus: psychosocial risks, the second reason for stopping work in France

According to Malakoff Humanis, who carried out the study, the phenomenon is explained by the anxiety-provoking health and economic context and may be linked to confinement. But the mutual also noted that 60% of employees had been anxious at the idea of ​​returning to work.

Daily allowances paid in the event of sick leave increased by 29.9% between January and August, according to figures from the Health Insurance.

Pandemic forces, sick leave exploded in France in the first half of the year. As noted by Le Figaro, the daily allowances paid in the event of sick leave increased by 29.9% between January and August, according to figures from the Health Insurance. And unsurprisingly, the coronavirus has become the first reason for stopping, or 26% of them in April, according to the barometer established by Malakoff Humanis.

Two months later, in June, the Covid was still responsible for 19% of the stops. The trend should not change since, as feared, the fall brought the second wave. On Wednesday evening, France recorded 13,072 new cases of Covid-19 in 24 hours.

Psychosocial risks

More surprisingly, at the beginning of the summer, around 14% of sick leaves were due to psychosocial risks, such as “problems with concentration, sleep, irritability, nervousness, severe fatigue, palpitations”, according to an INRS definition. the National Research and Safety Institute for the Prevention of Work Accidents and Occupational Diseases, linked to the State.

A novelty since in May, they still represented only 9% of sick leaves. In normal times, musculoskeletal disorders are the second most common reason for sick leave.

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Nearly half of employees in psychological distress because of confinement

Why such an increase in this type of shutdown? According to Malakoff Humanis, this phenomenon can be explained by the anxiety-provoking health and economic context and is linked in particular to the consequences of confinement. “Anything that will destabilize our temporal, social or economic benchmarks will increase our level of anxiety”, explained in March to Les Echos Christophe Debien, psychiatrist and head of pole at the National Resource and Resilience Center.

But the mutual also noticed that the majority of employees, 60% of them, were anxious at the idea of ​​returning to work. They were particularly apprehensive about taking public transport, or having to wear a mask all day.

This concern has also prompted 11% of employees to admit considering being prescribed a work stoppage so as not to have to return to their place of work.